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Lyric Poetry Complete Notes & Questions

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PAPER

3

EXAM

QUESTIONS


LYRIC

POETRY


Specific

questions:


1 'In

the

finest...English

lyrics,

even

very

complex

thoughts

and

images

can

be

unfolded

with...vivid

and


personal

lucidity'

(PETER

DRONKE).

By

what

means

is

this

effect

achieved?

(2000)


2 Either

(a)

'Stond

wel,

moder,

ounder

rode,/

Bihold

thi

child

with

glade

mode,

/Moder

blithe

might

thou

be.'


/

'Sone,

hou

may

ich

blithe

stonde?/

Ich

se

thine

fet

and

thine

honde

/

Y--nayled

to

the

harde

tre.'


(Anonymous

13th

Century

Lyric)

Discuss

the

uses

of

dialogic

form

(expressed

either

as

opposition

of


speakers

or

irreconcilable

opposition

of

opinions)

in

the

medieval

lyric.

(2001)


3 The

most

significant

feature

of

the

Middle

English

secular

lyric

is

its

subordinate

position

in

relation

to

the


religious'

(Rossell

Hope

Robbins).Discuss

with

reference

to

at

least

four

Middle

English

lyric

poems.

(2001)


4 The

author

or

these

poems

is

fascinated

by

the

boundaries

between

things;

between

places,

between


values,

between

loves'

(2002)


5 'The

Middle

English

Lyric

is

at

its

most

lyrical

when

it

stays

closest

to

song'.

Do

you

agree?

(2002)


6 'Whether

concerned

with

love

or

devotion

or

death,

the

medieval

lyric

writer

does

not

express

personal


emotion

so

much

as

describe

a

common

experience

in

the

first

person.'

Discuss.

(2002)


7 Medieval

poetry

was

written

to

be

heard

rather

than

read;

so,

probably,

was

much

medieval

prose'.

How


true

is

this

statement

and

what

does

it

imply

for

the

modern

reader

or

either

poems

or

prose

works

of

this


period?

(2002)


8 'Lyrics

vary

so

much

in

subject

matter,

form

and

language

that

we

can

not

easily

make

any

selection

which


forms

a

coherent

group'

a)

Consider

the

variety

of

medieval

lyrics

or

b)

write

about

a

selection

of

lyrics


which

seems

to

you

to

form

a

coherent

group.

(2003)


9 'Quant

phrases

on

a

good

subject

are

baits

to

make

an

ill

man

virtuous

(Owen

Feltam

1623)

Analyse

some


of

the

ways

in

which

Middle

English

lyrics

address

issues

of

moral,

chivalric

or

courtly

virtue

and

asses

their


effects.

(2005)


10 It

is

rarely

profitable

to

study

lyrics

in

isolation;

they

must

be

seen

as

part

of

a

broad

textual

economy

to


which

they

contribute

and

from

which

they

contribute

and

from

which

they

borrow.'

How

would

you

asses


the

place

of

lyrics

in

the

textual

economy

of

Middle

English

writing?

(2005)


11 'Poems

without

contexts'

(JOHN

BURROW).

What

are

the

implications

of

an

absence

of

context

for

the


interpretation

of

medieval

English

lyrics?

(2006)


12 How

important

is

an

understanding

of

metre

for

the

appreciation

of

medieval

poetry?

You

may

if

you

wish


confine

your

answer

to

the

work

of

any

ONE

poet.

(2006)


13 Analyse

the

interplay

between

learned

and

popular

elements

in

EITHER

a)

short

poems,

such

as

lyrics,


carols

or

ballads,

OR

b)

romances

(2007)

General

applicable

questions:

1. Which,

if

any,

of

the

texts

you

have

studied

for

this

paper

could

be

described

as

'oral

literature',

and

why?


(2007)

2. "[E]ven

love--poetry

is

made

out

of

words

and...its

"I"

and

"you"

mark

not

the

prescence

but

the

absense

of


human

subjects"

(Spearing).

How

should

modern

critics

best

approach

medieval

literature

written

in

the


first

person?

(

you

do

not

have

to

discuss

love--poetry

in

your

answer.)

(2007)

3. Where

in

the

literature

of

this

period

have

you

found

the

most

significant

relationship

between

content


and

literary

form?

(2007)

4. How

may

an

understanding

of

the

manuscript

AND

/

OR

printed

version

of

a

particular

text

or

texts


contribute

to

our

critical

judgement

about

them?

(2007)

5. 'Medieval

literature

is

renowned

for

its

diversity

and

frequent

resistance

to

generic

classification.'

Illustrate


this

proposition;.use

as

examples

one

or

two

texts

you

think

do

not

fit

within

the

terms

o

f

the

questions

or


quotations

above

(2004)

6. Where

in

your

study

of

medieval

poetry

or

prose

have

you

encountered

stylistic

techniques,

such

as

rhyme,


metre,

diction,

which

have

proved

an

effective

vehicle

for

particular

subject

matter?

(2003)

7. 'Long

before

Wordsworth,

medieval

writers

sought

wisdom

in

nature

and

asked

'Kynde'

to

'counseille'


them.

With

what

aims

and

to

what

effect?

(2002)


Repeated

themes

/

topics:


THEMATIC


-- use

of

nature


-- How

is

complexity

/

lucidity

of

images

and

ideas

presented


-- Boundaries


-- Morality

/

virtue

/

courtly

ideals


--


GENRE


-- Lyric

and

its

musical

qualities


-- Use

of

first

person

(to

show

common

experience

not

personal

emotion)


-- Oral

quality

of

poetry


-- Variety

in

lyrics

--

is

there

any

coherence


-- Defies

classification


-- Can

lyrics

be

understand

in

isolation


-- Need

for

/

use

of

context


-- How

important

is

metre


-- Relationship

between

form

and

content


-- Treatment

of

biblical

material


-- Gender


-- Form


-- Function

of

lyrics


-- Relationship

between

secular

and

religious

lyrics


-- Lyric

voice

and

the

use

of

dramatic

voices

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