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Sir Thomas More Utopia & Richard Iii Notes

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This is an extract of our Sir Thomas More Utopia & Richard Iii document, which we sell as part of our Renaissance Literature Notes collection written by the top tier of Oxford University students.

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RICHARD

THE

III


More

wrote

English

+

Latin

versions

of

The

History

of

Richard

III

around

1513,

but

he

never

published

either

work.

That


he

put

his

best

efforts

into

composing

it

can

be

easily

seen

in

the

eloquence

of

his

language,

(e.g

many

classical

allusions


+

that

he

wrote

two

different

versions

of

it)


Explores

the

nature

of

tyranny

?

how

it

was

possible

for

a

tyrant

to

come

to

power

in

England

despite

the

many

laws

/


institutions

that

had

been

developed.

It

is

highly

selective:

excluding

the

background

of

the

introduction,

it

covers

only

3


months,

9--04--1483

(the

death

of

Ed

IV)

to

after

July

6

(coronation

of

Rich

III).


Because

some

of

the

passages

in

the

Latin

text

are

so

striking,

the

earliest

editor

translated

and

included

some

of

them

in


the

authoritative

1557

edition

of

the

English

text.


Structure

of

the

Text:

1. INTRODUCTION:

Background

to

Richard's

Rise

2. RICHARD'S

PLAN

TO

CONTROL

YOUNG

EDWARD

V

3. SANCTUARY

AND

RICHARD'S

RESPONSE

4. RICHARD

EXTENDS

HIS

CONTROL

5. RICHARD'S

NEXT

STEP

TO

THE

CROWN

6. FINAL

STEPS

TO

RICHARD'S

CROWNING

7. MURDER

OF

THE

YOUNG

PRINCES

8. BUCKINGHAM'S

CONSPIRACY


RHETORICAL

FIGURES

IN

THE

HISTORY

OF

RICHARD

III


Erasmus

describes

More's

style

as

tending

more

"to

Isocratic

rhythm

and

logical

subtlety

than

to

the

outpouring

river


of

Ciceronian

eloquence,"

and

that

one

can

"recognize

a

poet

even

in

[More's]

prose

for

in

his

youth

he

spent

much


time

writing

poetry."


I. MAJOR

FIGURES

RELATED

TO

ETHOS

(i.e.,

to

the

character

of

the

speaker):


Anamnesis:

"Calling

to

memory

past

matters."

?

conveys

the

idea

that

the

speaker

is

knowledgeable

of

the

received


wisdom

from

the

past."

* Shaa

+

Buckingham

both

quote

scripture

in

their

speeches

.

In

the

Latin

version

uses

key

terms

from


Roman

history,

esp

insitutudes

of

self--government


Litotes:

"The

moderator."

--

Deliberate

understatement,

especially

when

expressing

a

thought

by

denying

its

opposite."


means

of

expressing

modesty

in

order

to

gain

the

audience's

favor

1.

To

Dispraise

Another

with

Less

Offense:

* "good

men

might,

as

I

think,

without

sin

somewhat

less

regard

it

than

they

do"

* as

though

no

man

mistrusted

the

matter,

which

of

truth

no

man

believed"

(

2. To

Praise

Another

with

Greater

Modesty:

* "taunting

without

displeasure,

and

not

without

play"

(49.15--16).

* "and

thanks

be

to

God

they

got

not

good,

nor

you

none

harm

thereby"

(45.7--8).

3. To

Disagree

with

Less

Offense:

* "Yet

will

I

not

say

nay"

(25.2)

* "No

man

denies"

(29.30).

* "And

then

said

he

to

the

Queen

he

nothing

doubted

but

that

those

lords

of

her

honorable

kin

.

.

.


should,

upon

the

matter

examined,

do

well

enough"

(31.1--4).


Martyria:

Confirms

a

question

by

one's

own

experience

=

credibility

* "However,

this

I

have

by

credible

information

learned

.

.

."

(6.14--

15).

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