Someone recently bought our

students are currently browsing our notes.

X

Changing Images Of Childhood Notes

Management Notes > Children & Youth Markets Notes

This is an extract of our Changing Images Of Childhood document, which we sell as part of our Children & Youth Markets Notes collection written by the top tier of University Of Exeter (Business School) students.

The following is a more accessble plain text extract of the PDF sample above, taken from our Children & Youth Markets Notes. Due to the challenges of extracting text from PDFs, it will have odd formatting:

Changing Images Of Childhood (Sorin, 2005)

Childhood By TenThe term childhood is generally recognised as a socially constructed phenomenon (Arthur, 2005).Childhood has been variously described as:o

The period of birth to 6 or 7.

o

When the child can articulate clearly.

o

Birth to when the child can reproduce.

o

Birth to when the child can work.

o

Birth to when the child can live independently of parents.

According to the UN Convention of the Rights of the Child (1989) childhood spans from birth to age 18. Yet the age of consent, the voting age, the driving age and the drinking age all vary with location and culture. Invariably the voices of the children themselves do not come into consideration when these life transition points are decided.?

Historically there are three dominant images of the child:
o

The innocent child.

o

The evil child.

o

The miniature adult.

However, these images alone do not cover the varying ways that children and childhood are constructed by adult society. Other ways of constructing childhood include o

The noble child.

o

The snowballing child.

o

The out of control child.

o

The adult in training child.

o

The child as commodity.

o

The child as victim.

o

The agentic child.

The Innocent ChildChildhood as an innocent pure time of life separate to adulthood is an image that has been present since the late middle ages.In the early childhood classroom, this construct is visible in practices of censorship or sheltering children from the real world.The books, videos and fames we choose for children are often sanitised to present some aspects of life whilst excluding others.The construct of childhood innocence comes at a price. It positions children as incompetent, vulnerable and dependent.While a need to protect children from harm is a very real concern in these violent times, it is a concern that protection is becoming surveillance and control and children are not being given rights or opportunities to act on their own behalf
(Dockett, 1998).

Buy the full version of these notes or essay plans and more in our Children & Youth Markets Notes.