Someone recently bought our

students are currently browsing our notes.

X

Reunion Europenne Notes

BCL Law Notes > Conflict of Laws BCL Notes

This is an extract of our Reunion Europenne document, which we sell as part of our Conflict of Laws BCL Notes collection written by the top tier of Oxford students.

The following is a more accessble plain text extract of the PDF sample above, taken from our Conflict of Laws BCL Notes. Due to the challenges of extracting text from PDFs, it will have odd formatting:

REUNION EUROPENNE FACTS Those questions arose in proceedings brought by nine insurance companies and, as lead insurer, the company Réunion Européenne (hereinafter 'the insurers'), which have been subrogated to the rights of the company Brambi Fruits (hereinafter 'Brambi'), whose registered office is in Rungis (France), against Spliethoff's Bevrachtingskantoor BV, whose registered office is in Amsterdam (Netherlands), and the Master of the vessel Alblasgracht V002, residing in the Netherlands, following the discovery of damage to a cargo of 5 199 cartons of pears delivered to Brambi, in the carriage of which the defendants were involved. The action was brought relying on Art. 5(1) for the breach of a contractual obligation or in the alternative, under Art. 5(3). QUESTION May a defendant domiciled in the territory of a Contracting State be brought, in another Contracting State, before the court hearing an action against a co-defendant not domiciled in the territory of any Contracting State, on the ground that the dispute is indivisible, rather than merely displaying a connection?
HOLDING Place where the damage occurred The consignee had entered into a contract under which goods were first transported by sea and then by land. The claim here is against the sea-carrier and the question is where the damage occurred. It follows that a consignee of goods who, on completion of a transport operation by sea and then by land, finds that the goods delivered to him are damaged may bring proceedings against the person whom he regards as the actual maritime carrier either before the courts for the place where the damage occurred or the courts for the place of the event giving rise to it. As the Advocate General emphasises in points 54 to 56 of his Opinion, in an international transport operation of the kind at issue in the main proceedings the place where the event giving rise to the damage occurred may be difficult or indeed impossible to determine. In such circumstances, it will be for the consignee of the damaged goods to bring the actual maritime carrier before the courts for the place where the damage occurred. It must be pointed out in that regard that, in an international transport operation of the kind at issue in the main proceedings, the place where the damage occurred cannot be either the place of final delivery, which, as the Commission rightly pointed out, can be

Buy the full version of these notes or essay plans and more in our Conflict of Laws BCL Notes.

More Conflict Of Laws Bcl Samples